Visiting Buchenwald Memorial in Weimar

By lodging-world.com

Weimar was an important intellectual centre during the 18th and 19th centuries. The city is a UNESCO world heritage because of its historical architecture from the 18th century and its beautiful parks. The city has an amazing selection of cultural and historical points of interest. It also has over 40 museums, covering almost everything from the Stone Age to the modern art. When visiting the city, tourists should consider visiting Buchenwald Memorial in Weimar.

About the Buchenwald Memorial

By holocaustresearchproject.org

The Buchenwald Memorial museum is a former Nazi concentration camp in Ettersberg, near Weimar. Visiting Buchenwald Memorial in Weimar is about seeing the largest concentration camp in Germany. Jews and prisoners worked here as forced labour in German armament factories. The concentration camp was built by the Nazis in 1937, very close to Weimar. The camp’s main entrance show the slogan “Jedem das Seine”, which means “each has his own” or “everyone gets what he deserves”. The place was operational until the end of the war, after which the Soviet Union took over the place and turned it into NKVD special camp. In 1950, the camp was handed over again to Germany. The camp preserves Goethe’s oak.

What happened at the camp?

By holocaustresearchproject.org

Over 200,000 people were incarcerated inBuchenwaldcamp between 1938 and 1945, out of which 50,000 were killed. During the war bombing, the place was heavily damaged. Goethe’s oak and several prisoners in the courtyard have been affected. There were less than 1,000 women prisoners atBuchenwaldand they being watched by women guards. The camp had also a number of prisoners of war fromUnited States,United KingdomandNew Zealand. They were captured after their plane crashed in the occupiedFrance. A fewNorwegianUniversitystudents were also imprisoned here but they had been offered better condition that the rest of prisoners, as they were supposed to be used as cannon fodder. The students slept in warmer barracks and had their own clothes.

By holocaustresearchproject.org

Although this was not an extermination camp, many died here. They died because of the harsh conditions, because of starvation or because they were forced to work until they died. Some of them were simply shot by the guards and some others were used for medical experiments. At the end of the war, this was the first camp liberated by theUStroops and a monument to victims was erected a few days after.

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